HealthCare.gov Sees Dramatic Enrollment Increase

HealthCare.gov Sees Dramatic Enrollment Increase

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Over the course of 2014, more than eight million individuals enrolled in healthcare plans through Healthcare.gov, bringing an increase of more than six million in enrollment. And two million of those who signed up were from insurers’ most desirable demographic: millennials, or namely, people under the age of 35.

As of December 2014, 6.4 million signed up or automatically enrolled in health insurance through Healthcare.gov, a health insurance provider that sells subsidized individuals insurance in 37 states across the country. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services secretary Sylvia Burwell, millions have received coverage through the program that also provides state-based insurance exchanges in Washington, D.C. and other states.

According to the figures provided by Health and Human Services, 71% — or 5.8 million — of Healthcare.gov’s enrollees had their previous coverage plans renewed. The 2.1 million below the age of 35 were first-time purchasers of the insurance.

And it is currently the third period that allows individuals who don’t have coverage through their job or programs like Medicare to access subsidies and plans through sites like Healthcare.org. Many individuals in this position would otherwise not be able to afford healthcare. For individuals who cannot afford coverage, urgent care centers typically provide low-cost healthcare. In fact, there are more than 20,000 active urgent care physicians across the country.

As December 15, 2015 rolled around, federal officials observed a dramatic influx of of enrollment to purchase or switch coverage that went into effect on January 1.

According to Wall Street Journal, people have until the end of January to either buy coverage and make changes that will begin in February or March.

For the 2016 season, Obama’s administration has set a relatively modest goal, planning to have 10 million Americans enrolled in Healthcare.gov and state equivalent coverage by the end of 2016.