Court Handling of Harassment akin to Uber Complaint

Court Handling of Harassment akin to Uber Complaint

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Justice administrative system dominates by Whites in Wilmington, DE with majority population being Black

What’s up with the apparent overt bias in the judicial system in Delaware?  Acknowledging problems exist, October 2016 Delaware held an anti-bias workshop for over 500 lawyers, judges, and other justice system officials; apparently to no avail for underrepresented litigants.

Wilmington is the largest city in Delaware and known as corporate capital of the world.  The city’s population is composed of approximately 55% black, 28% white, 14% Hispanic and 3% combined other races.  Even so, the justice ethos surrounding the district court in the 21st Century is unapologetically dominated by Whites. Over my fours years of visiting the Federal court building and an area known as lawyers’ row, I encountered few Blacks working as security, parking attendants, and janitors. However noticeably, judges, court staff, attorneys, court reporters, paralegals, couriers, and even receptionists are White and working there.  Seemingly beyond reproach, Federal district court judges have lifetime appointments.

Susan Fowler’s blog post documenting Uber’s poor handling of her sexual harassment complaint went viral. Should her case proceed to court, be forewarned that pursuing discrimination claims at court can be equally demoralizing and brutal. I don’t think my story is unique, however shocking that Delaware Federal District Court conspicuous delays in the management of my case 1:14-cv-1021-LPS feel intentional and equally as damaging as alleged discriminatory practices delivered by my former employer.

According to Karin Huffer, you may be suffering from Legal Abuse Syndrome: 1) if you feel deeply disillusioned and oppressed as a result of your experience with the legal system; 2) if you have been frustrated in your effort to obtain justice; 3) if you feel your dreams and plans for your life were torn from you by a system that supposedly was there to protect your rights and property; 4) if you fear that the system will defeat you at every turn and there is nothing you can do about it; and 5) if you feel you have been victimized several times over by the perpetrators, by lawyers, judges, bailiffs and other court personnel.

#DefiningBlackCommunity YOU CAN DEFINE SOMETHING THAT HAS MEANING.

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the characteristic spirit of a culture, era, or community as manifested in its beliefs and aspirations.